How to Improve Your Marketing Outreach

It’s undeniable that communication is key in business and marketing. Communication happens between businesses, between customers and a business, between customers and customers, and between businesses and potential customers. So why aren’t we capitalizing more on this critical opportunity by facilitating quality conversations through these outlets? Here are some suggestions on how to get more out of your marketing strategy.

1) Focus Your Efforts

It’s easy to look at the sea of potential customers available to you and want to reach them all with some form of communication. That’s just not a viable goal. Focus your attention on a certain demographic group. If you are selling a niche product, such as geriatric scooters, it would be a waste to reach out to everyone in the United States. Eliminate prospects under 50 years old and redirect your marketing dollars into our next tip. Quality communication is much more important than quantity.

2) Personalize

People are seven times more likely to respond to marketing and take action if it is personalized. They don’t want to see “or current resident” on their mailer with an offer that has nothing to do with them. Purchase a marketing list that boasts a low bounce back rate and features residents’ full names. Mass emails fall into the same category, but are even more cost-effective to personalize. Typically, emails can only be sent to someone who has opted in, so your list will contain first names and the information you need. Be sure to clean and purge this data before you hit send by removing duplicates and fixing abnormal capitalizations.

3) Don’t Alienate Current Customers

Nothing is more frustrating to your established customer base than receiving an offer they can’t take advantage of; much less, one that rewards a new revenue stream. Credit card and cable companies are famous for enticing new prospects with hard to resist deals. If your customers receive a marketing piece that gives new members more benefits than their existing plan, you risk alienating them. You’ve just told your bread and butter that they aren’t worth the best deal, and that loyalty means nothing. Be sure to purge your prospective clients mailing list of current clients before sending.

4) Set a Goal

Is your goal to gain more clients or to retain current ones? How do you hope this outreach will impact your business? Do you want a 10% increase in sales or just to generate buzz? All of these goals will affect your outreach. Who you target and what your goals are will define your message as well as how the results are measured. Take the time to pre-outreach and reflect on your business, and on what areas need to be improved so ROI can be maximized.

What are your steps to planning a successful outreach campaign? Tell us your thoughts below!

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